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IT COSTS HIM LIFE

IT COSTS HIM LIFE

 

At the raw age of sixteen plus when boys are growing up to be men, the World stands wide and open; to be explored in its all dimensions. Comfort, money, status, amenities and goodies of material life affect parents to choose careers for their children. In most circumstances the children are guided and motivated to excel beyond status of parents in careers and professions for better. Material gains play a dominant role in career selection.

At this point some make choice for which they are ready to pay the price voluntarily. Then they pay it throughout their life! The young one’s who choose Army as their career spend rest of their life in Khaki. It is not a profession and they don’t choose it for reason other than, that it is a way of life in its all spheres. It has unique set of values and norms may it be leadership, faith, sincerity, selflessness, obedience, truth, duty, courage, customs, traditions and inter-personal relationship. And it is taken as such. They have opted to join an organization that does not ask for ascending graphs of sales and profits but asks for taking a bullet squarely along with so many to be motivated and led for the same. This profession does not ask for leaning in a chair patenting software but to go and face the rigors of combat, weather and inhospitable country side. It does not ask for designer tie and lounge suite but needs someone to done a thirty pounds flak jacket in ricocheting bullets. It does not ask to safely voyage through city traffic lights to your air conditioned workplace but to smilingly jostle in a tank with temperatures soaring to boiling point in mid of the desert. It does not ask to shuttle between the corporate offices with laptop dangling but to deliver a round of a gun to the accuracy of meters at places that one can not see. It does not ask to develop and enjoy a company of people in a five star lobby but to assault with troops leading under fire to a place where some one is waiting and willing to take pot shot on any moving thing. It is a choice made at the raw age for toil, sweat and blood for the life.

Profession of arms is a high cost job. It is job for which one pays for the life. It is a job for which not only the individual pays but parents, brothers, sisters, wife, sons and daughters pay. One is not there once father is sick, one is not there once mother departs for Haj, one is not there once brother graduates, one hardly makes it some times and not at all, many a times once sister gets married. One does not remember the day once daughter went school for the first time, son was promoted to the next class and wife kept waiting for an evening out on an anniversary. Some one who misses all these occasions, it remains mystery that where he conceals himself? He is either on Siachin freezing in sub-zero temperatures, or jolting in a tank on a summer afternoon, bumping mercilessly with up and down drafts in a helicopter, disarming an explosive device under fire, assaulting uphill in mountains, resting or sleeping in craggy ditch to reinvigorate himself.

Sons and daughters pay most heavily in this gambit. They change more schools than their years in age. Change friends more than they have changed nappies and travel and live in places which kids of their age have never heard the names. They see their father only early mornings and late nights. They keep planning outings that never happen, visits which never materialize and picnic dreams that never come true. They plan their birthdays with mother only, taking absence of father as constant. They continue their academic pursuits with verbal encouragement only. Tuition from father is remotest possibility for which they satisfy themselves from mother or in many cases elder sibling tutoring younger. They don’t even plan outings to places where siblings of their age hang out as routine. They frequently see their mother doing a balancing act with income and expenditures and that prohibits them form indulging in extravagances.

Any ordinary officer and soldier in his Army life keeps paying for his choice he had made. He does it smilingly and with an acute sense of humour. His cost can not be measured in quantum.  He spends his growing years of boyhood in uniform, grows up to be a man and retires at an age where his contemporaries in civil are at peak of their professional pursuits. He pays it all the way. He pays the cost in his personal comfort, his physical hardships, loosing his boyhood displaying high standards of leadership coupled with raw courage to his men, neglect of parents at early stage followed by wife and children later, exposure to bullets, danger, chilling winters in mountains, scorching summers in deserts and fear of death under fire.

Yes! He pays the ultimate cost of choosing his career by loosing his life. His choice costs him LIFE; because we all sleep snug and tight.